Tag Archives: Abraham

Ninth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 14

Track 1: Be Dressed for Action

Isaiah 1:1, 10-20
Psalm 50:1-8, 23-24
Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-16
Luke 12:32-40

In today’s Gospel we read:

“Be dressed for action and have your lamps lit; be like those who are waiting for their master to return from the wedding banquet, so that they may open the door for him as soon as he comes and knocks. Blessed are those slaves whom the master finds alert when he comes; truly I tell you, he will fasten his belt and have them sit down to eat, and he will come and serve them. If he comes during the middle of the night, or near dawn, and finds them so, blessed are those slaves.   (Luke 12:35-38)

How do we interpret his remarks today. Surely Jesus is warning us to keep our lamps lit. That would mean that we are to keep the fullness of the Spirit of God in our hearts. Are ww living in the end times? We have been since the beginning of the Church. But does this mean the rapture of the Church is immanent and we need to be living holy lives in preparation?

Before his ascension, the disciples of Jesus were concerned about the timing of end times events. They asked Jesus:

“Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”   (Acts 1:6-8)

Jesus was more concerned about saving lost souls. He said: “Be dressed for action.” Our lamps should be lit for more than the rapture. He would give his disciples the gift of the Holy Spirit so that they might be effective witnesses to his resurrection.

God spoke through the Prophet Isaiah:

Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean;
remove the evil of your doings
from before my eyes;

cease to do evil,
learn to do good;

seek justice,
rescue the oppressed,

defend the orphan,
plead for the widow.   (Isaiah 1:16-17)

We are to be clean, and we are to learn to do good. Jesus washes us in his blood. He also calls us to be evangelists. For this we need to be dressed for action, The Apostle Paul wrote:.

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his power; put on the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil, for our struggle is not against blood and flesh but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.[Therefore take up the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to withstand on the evil day and, having prevailed against everything, to stand firm. Stand, therefore, and belt your waist with truth and put on the breastplate of righteousness and lace up your sandals in preparation for the gospel of peace. With all of these, take the shield of faith, with which you will be able to quench all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. Pray in the Spirit at all times in every prayer and supplication. To that end, keep alert and always persevere in supplication for all the saints.   (Ephesians 6:10-18)

Let us be dressed for action. And may our actions help win souls for the kingdom of God.

 

Track 2: The Faith of Abraham

Genesis 15:1-6
Psalm 33:12-22
Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-16
Luke 12:32-40

We are saved by the grace of God through the saving acts of our Lord Jesus Christ. He must not underestimate the importance of faith, however. The Apostle Paul wrote:

For by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God— not the result of works, so that no one may boast.   (Ephesians 2:8-9)

To fully understand the importance of faith to our Christian walk we need to examine the faith of Abraham. Our faith stands on the foundation of his faith. His faith was tested by God. Again Paul wrote:

Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed and so became the father of many nations, just as it had been said to him, “So shall your offspring be.” Without weakening in his faith, he faced the fact that his body was as good as dead—since he was about a hundred years old—and that Sarah’s womb was also dead. Yet he did not waver through unbelief regarding the promise of God, but was strengthened in his faith and gave glory to God, being fully persuaded that God had power to do what he had promised. This is why “it was credited to him as righteousness.” The words “it was credited to him” were written not for him alone, but also for us, to whom God will credit righteousness—for us who believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead.   (Romans 4:18-24)

God put Abraham to severe test:

By faith Abraham, when put to the test, offered up Isaac. He who had received the promises was ready to offer up his only son, of whom he had been told, “It is through Isaac that descendants shall be named for you.” He considered the fact that God is able even to raise someone from the dead—and figuratively speaking, he did receive him back.   (Hebrews 11:17-19) 

Abraham passed the test because Abraham believed God. He did hot focus on the circumstance that surrounded him. He held onto the Word and promises of.of God. In our lives we are tested. The enemy brings us circumstanced to make us doubt God’s word. We may wonder if God still loves us, if he is still with us. If we are not careful, we may begin to blame our troubles on God.

But God is still with us.  He does still love us.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.”   (John 3:16)

The psalmist wrote:

Our soul waits for the Lord;
    he is our help and shield.
Our heart is glad in him
    because we trust in his holy name.
Let your steadfast love, O Lord, be upon us,
    even as we hope in you.   (Psalm 33:20-22)

In the Book of James we read:

My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in nothing.   (James 1:2-4)
Jesus said:
“In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!”   (John 16:33)

Abraham would not be distracted by circumstances. He lived by a faith that manifested in obedience to God:

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to set out for a place that he was to receive as an inheritance; and he set out, not knowing where he was going. By faith he stayed for a time in the land he had been promised, as in a foreign land, living in tents, as did Isaac and Jacob, who were heirs with him of the same promise. For he looked forward to the city that has foundations, whose architect and builder is God.   (Hebrews 11:8-10)

We have many distractions today. We are going through difficult trials. We need the faith Abraham. We need his courage and dedication to God. As Abraham, let us understand that God is with us, Emanuel. He will never leave us or forsake us. Do we believe God? Then, praise the Lord. We, too, are children of Abraham.

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Seventh Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 12

Track 1: Playing the Harlot

Hosea 1:2-10
Psalm 85
Colossians 2:6-15, (16-19)
Luke 11:1-13

God commands Hosea to marry a “wife of whoredom [zenunim],” . This Hebrew term indicates illicit sexual behavior. Reading from Hosea:

When the Lord first spoke through Hosea, the Lord said to Hosea, “Go, take for yourself a wife of whoredom and have children of whoredom, for the land commits great whoredom by forsaking the Lord.” So he went and took Gomer daughter of Diblaim, and she conceived and bore him a son.   (Hosea 1:2-3)

This is the first of a series of expressions in Hosea where God puts himself in the place of a forsaken human lover. Israel had forsaken God by worshipping the false gods of their neighboring nations. Baal worship was one of them whereby the Israelites had to sacrifice their children for a prosperous harvest.

In our nation we may not actually worship Baal, though it has been reported that some of  our leaders do. Unwittingly, we may have been worshipping Baal by the horrendous number of abortions committed each year.

But let us discuss another from of worship. Do we get excited about big league sports and popular celebrities and entertainment that our church services? These are not necessarily bad, but can be major distractions. Who is in control of some these events? It should be easy to tell by some of the Super Bowl halftime shows. Then there is the ideology of some of the big time players of sports which is certainly not Godly or even patriotic.Are they being paid  to speak this nonsense?

How exiting and uplifting are our church services? Possibly not so much if God is locked out of our buttoned downed worship. God wants real worship. Jesus told the Samaritan woman at the well:

The hour is coming and is now here when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such as these to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.   (John 4:23-24)

The psalmist wrote:

I will give thanks to you, O Lord, with my whole heart;
before the gods I will sing your praise.

I will bow down toward your holy temple
and praise your Name,
because of your love and faithfulness;

For you have glorified your Name
and your word above all things.   (Psalm 85:1-3)

Are we being seduced by “lovers” other than God and his Son Jesus Christ? Through Hosea God had to tell Israel:

You are not my people and I am not your God.   (Hosea 1:10)

The psalmist wrote:

Happy is the nation whose God is the Lord,
    the people whom he has chosen as his heritage.   (Psalm 33:12)

God is now speaking to our nation, as he is to every nation around the world. We use to be the moral compass for the world. Is the world now becoming our moral compass. We are living in an extended time for repentance and God is waiting on us. Hr wants to bless us. God we want to bless him? The psalmist wrote:

Will you not give us life again,
that your people may rejoice in you?

Show us your mercy, O Lord,
and grant us your salvation.

I will listen to what the Lord God is saying,
for he is speaking peace to his faithful people
and to those who turn their hearts to him.

Truly, his salvation is very near to those who fear him,
that his glory may dwell in our land.

Mercy and truth have met together;
righteousness and peace have kissed each other.

Truth shall spring up from the earth,
and righteousness shall look down from heaven.

The Lord will indeed grant prosperity,
and our land will yield its increase.

Righteousness shall go before him,
and peace shall be a pathway for his feet.

 

Track 2: Abraham’s Intercession

Genesis 18:20-32
Psalm 138
Colossians 2:6-15, (16-19)
Luke 11:1-13

Abraham had a relationship with God the Father. He had access to him. He spoke to God face to face. He believed the promises of God more than the circumstances that he saw around him, not matter how unlikely they might seem to the human mind. He believed God’s Word and trusted that God would act upon his Word. God saw this in Abraham. He tested Abraham’s faith and Abraham passed all tests, no matter how severe they might be. Because of this, God counted Abraham’s faith as righteousness.

In today’s Old Testament reading we see Abraham interceding for the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. God was prepared to destroy the cities because of their wickedness:

The Lord said to Abraham, “How great is the outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah and how very grave their sin! I must go down and see whether they have done altogether according to the outcry that has come to me; and if not, I will know.”

So the men turned from there, and went toward Sodom, while Abraham remained standing before the Lord. Then Abraham came near and said, “Will you indeed sweep away the righteous with the wicked? Suppose there are fifty righteous within the city; will you then sweep away the place and not forgive it for the fifty righteous who are in it? Far be it from you to do such a thing, to slay the righteous with the wicked, so that the righteous fare as the wicked! Far be that from you! Shall not the Judge of all the earth do what is just?” And the Lord said, “If I find at Sodom fifty righteous in the city, I will forgive the whole place for their sake.”   (Genesis 18:20-26)

There are many remarkable things about the prayers of Abraham. God listens to Abraham and takes into account what Abraham is saying. God allowed Abraham to reason with him, the Almighty God and creator of the universe and all like within it. What we view is a partnership of love and concern for all peoples, even exceptionally evil people.

Can we pray like Abraham? We should be able to do so. God calls us to such prayer. But we must have access to God. He must be able to look at us and see righteousness. In the Book of James ew read:

The prayer of the righteous is powerful and effective.   (James 5:16)

Jesus is our access. He is our righteousness by faith:

For by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God— not the result of works, so that no one may boast.   (Ephesians 2:8-9)

Are we now ready to pray like Abraham? In order to pray like Abraham we must also see like Abraham. Abraham had compassion for the entire human race, even for citizens of Sodom and G. In other words, Abraham was able to look through the eyes of God. Each person has the potential to become like God. He did not want to interfere with that divine call of God. Rather, he wanted to intercede for that call.

Are we able to pray for the people we judge? Are we able to pray for our enemies? Jesus said:

But I say unto you which hear, Love your enemies, do good to them which hate you, Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.   (Luke 6:28)

A true intercessor before God has no human enemies. The Apostle Paul wrote:

for our struggle is not against blood and flesh but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.   (Ephesians 6:12)

Because of his faith, Abraham looked forward forward with optimism for the kingdom of God to be established:

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to set out for a place that he was to receive as an inheritance, and he set out, not knowing where he was going. By faith he stayed for a time in the land he had been promised, as in a foreign land, living in tents, as did Isaac and Jacob, who were heirs with him of the same promise. For he looked forward to the city that has foundations, whose architect and builder is God.   (Hebrews 11:8-10)

We are in partnership with God. God needs prayers. We need his wisdom and direction. Let us follow the example of the Father of faith and pray for the lost. For in our day we see many Sodom’s and Gomorrah’s.

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Sixth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 11

Track 1: Out of Balance

mos 8:1-12
Psalm 52
Colossians 1:15-28
Luke 10:38-42

The worship and presence of God is an inconvenience to the wicked. The Prophet Amos wrote:

The songs of the temple shall become wailings in that day,
says the Lord God;

“the dead bodies shall be many,
cast out in every place. Be silent!”

Hear this, you that trample on the needy,
and bring to ruin the poor of the land,

saying, “When will the new moon be over
so that we may sell grain;

and the sabbath,
so that we may offer wheat for sale?

We will make the ephah small and the shekel great,
and practice deceit with false balances,

buying the poor for silver
and the needy for a pair of sandals,
and selling the sweepings of the wheat.

The Lord has sworn by the pride of Jacob:

Surely I will never forget any of their deeds.   (Amos 8:1-12)

The wicked are about gaining wealth and power at other people’s expense.. The psalmist wrote:

You tyrant, why do you boast of wickedness
against the godly all day long?

You plot ruin;
your tongue is like a sharpened razor,
O worker of deception.

You love evil more than good
and lying more than speaking the truth.

You love all words that hurt,
O you deceitful tongue.

Oh, that God would demolish you utterly,
topple you, and snatch you from your dwelling,
and root you out of the land of the living!

The righteous shall see and tremble,
and they shall laugh at him, saying,

“This is the one who did not take God for a refuge,
but trusted in great wealth
and relied upon wickedness.   (Psalm 52:1-7)

Today we have our version if wickedness. But little has changed. “You love evil more than good and lying more than speaking the truth.” Of whom does this statement remind us? Politicians? The media? The CEO’s of corporations? Perhaps even some church leaders?

Evil leaders want to keep out of balance. They want to mislead and misdirect. They create false narratives to divide us and demoralize us. What is our defense?

In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus told Martha:

“Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; there is need of only one thing.”   (Luke 10:41-42)

The distractions and distortions of today are not new. The enemy has always used them. In many cases, he dupes us into thinking that these are valid concerns which take precedent over all others. Jesus us tells us that only one thing takes precedent. What is this one thing?

The psalmist wrote:

You show me the path of life.
    In your presence there is fullness of joy;
    in your right hand are pleasures forevermore.   (Psalm 16:11)

There is only one path of like. There is only one place with the fullnes of joy. God invites us into his presence. Only in him is there balance in our lives. Only in his presence is there freedom and truth. Jesus was imparting God’s presence to Mary.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him God was pleased to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, by making peace through the blood of his cross.

And you who were once estranged and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him– provided that you continue securely established and steadfast in the faith, without shifting from the hope promised by the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven.  (Colossians 1:19-23)

Once we selfish just like other evil doers. But we have been reconciles to God. Let us hold on to the hope of the Gospel and not become distracted and discouraged by the lies of the enemy. This, alone, brings balance to our lives and joy to our souls.

 

Track 2: Our Choices in Life

Genesis 18:1-10a
Psalm 15
Colossians 1:15-28
Luke 10:38-42

In today’s Gospel we read of the two sisters Mary and Martha:

Now as they went on their way, he entered a certain village where a woman named Martha welcomed him. She had a sister named Mary, who sat at Jesus’s feet and listened to what he was saying. But Martha was distracted by her many tasks, so she came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself? Tell her, then, to help me.”   (Luke 10:38-48)

“Are you and Mary or a Martha?”How many times have we heard this question? This passage in Luke has little to do about the personalities of Mary and Martha. Mary was spiritual and Martha was practical. This is entirely too simplistic. Martha was very spiritual. Reading from the Gospel of John:

When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met him, while Mary stayed at home. Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But even now I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.” Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.” Martha said to him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day.” Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” She said to him, “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.”   (John 11:20-27)

Neither Mary nor a Martha was a Mary of a Martha (so to speak). We must look deeper. Reading on:

But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things, but few things are needed—indeed only one. Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.”   (Luke 10:41-42)

This passage is about a visitation from God and the choices we make. First, let us look at a visitation from God in the Old Testament:

The Lord appeared to Abraham by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat at the entrance of his tent in the heat of the day. He looked up and saw three men standing near him. When he saw them, he ran from the tent entrance to meet them, and bowed down to the ground. He said, “My lord, if I find favor with you, do not pass by your servant. Let a little water be brought, and wash your feet, and rest yourselves under the tree. Let me bring a little bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on– since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.”   (Genesis 18:1-5)

God visited Abraham in the form of three persons. Abraham was aware that there was something different about these men. He stopped all that he was doing and put all hi8 efforts into encouraging them to stay with him.

This brings us to the choice. God comes to us, but we must receive him. Why would we not want to receive him? If we wish to hide our sin, then his visitation would not be welcome. But it is more likely that neither Abraham, Mary, or Martha were hiding away from God because of their sin.

Martha was entertaining Jesus and she probably realized that Jesus was a Godly man. She knew about his miraculous power. Why was she upset?

Jesus said that she was “worried and distracted by many things,” We all have practical duties to perform, and they are important. Martha was not  wrong about wanting to do her chores. Perhaps she was  wrong about how important they were to complete in the moment, above all else. Perhaps she was wrong about thy importance of her role in performing them, as compared to that of someone else.

We can easily be distracted when the mundane is elevated above the spiritual. The enemy uses distractions to keep us from answering the call of God. He does so by convincing us that we are doing the right thing,  God is important, but he must wait his turn because we are in the middle of an urgent and vital task that he would want us to complete first.

Life is about choices. Do we chose God first or second, now or later. The Prophet Isaiah wrote:

Seek the Lord while he may be found;
    call upon him while he is near;
let the wicked forsake their way
    and the unrighteous their thoughts;
let them return to the Lord, that he may have mercy on them,
    and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.   (Isaiah 55:6-7)

We should not take the Lord’s visitation forgranted.  God came to bless Abraham. Mary set under the blessings of Christ Jesus. And God comes to bless us. The psalmist wrote:

You show me the path of life.
    In your presence there is fullness of joy;
    in your right hand are pleasures forevermore.   (Psalm 16:11)

I was once programming a computer. I was struggling through a difficult part when the Lord visited me. I asked him to please wait. Dummy me had to learn he came to assist me. He cares about all that we do. I needed to priories my life by putting him first. Otherwise I was going to miss his visitations and blessings.

Life is about choices. Jesus said:

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.   (John 10:10)

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Independence Day

John Trumbull's painting, Declaration of Independence, depicting the five-man drafting committee of the Declaration of Independence presenting their work to the Congress.

A More Perfect Union

On our Independence Day, as we celebrate our great heritage as a nation, let us compare our nation with another great nation. In biblical times, this nation was given a great promise and covenant from God. This is the nation of Israel. Today, both of these nations are in a great struggle.

The founding fathers of these two nations had at least one thing in common, they trusted in and relied upon God for their formation and mission. One nation was to be a great missionary nation. The other was commissioned by God to be a holy nation and royal priesthood.

Let us look at America first. The delegates, who signed the Declaration of Independence, took on great personal risk. They were fighting for what they thought was a higher cause, greater than any personal gain they might achieve. As written in the Declaration, they affirmed:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

As part of this Declaration, they made a pledge:

we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

They did so, realizing the danger this pledge might bring to them personally. Nevertheless, they did not look back. They fully gave themselves to the cause.

The cost was steep. Five signers of the Declaration were captured by the British as traitors and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army, another had two sons captured. Nine of them fought and died from wounds or hardships from the war.

Perhaps, without realizing it, they were following the example of Abraham and his descendants. Abraham entered into a covenant with God. When he did so he entered into unknown territory. The Book of Hebrews tells us:

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to set out for a place that he was to receive as an inheritance; and he set out, not knowing where he was going. By faith he stayed for a time in the land he had been promised, as in a foreign land, living in tents, as did Isaac and Jacob, who were heirs with him of the same promise. For he looked forward to the city that has foundations, whose architect and builder is God.   (Hebrews 11:8-10)

Abraham did not look back. He endured hardship, not only for the promise which God had made to him personally,.but for the benefit of all the generations who would follow him. Those who followed endured great hardships as well. From Hebrews we read:

All of these died in faith without having received the promises, but from a distance they saw and greeted them. They confessed that they were strangers and foreigners on the earth, for people who speak in this way make it clear that they are seeking a homeland. If they had been thinking of the land that they had left behind, they would have had opportunity to return. But as it is, they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God; indeed, he has prepared a city for them.   (Hebrews 11:13-16)

The hardships were for a reason. God had chosen Israel for a divine purpose. At Mount Sinai, God spoke to Moses concerning their mission: 

‘You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to Myself. Now therefore, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be a special treasure to Me above all people; for all the earth is Mine. And you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.’ These are the words which you shall speak to the children of Israel.”   (Exodus 19:4-6)

Over the years, God had been shaping Israel. It has not yet become a holy nation or a royal priesthood.  Nonetheless, what is impossible for humankind is possible with God. Nonetheless, we are indebted to Israel for our faith which leads to salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ.

After the terrible battle of Gettysburg, which cost so many lives, Abraham Lincoln spoke these words in his famous address:

The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

We have not fulfilled these words. Despite our efforts, we have fallen short of the dream that our forefathers had for America. We are not yet that one nation under God, which provides freedom and liberty to all its citizens. Nor or we the great missionary nation which God has called us to be. This does not mean that we should stop striving. Without God the dream would not even be possible.

Our nation is now under attack, both from without and from within. There are people and forces who wish to destroy America as we know it in order to build their Utopia. While they strive to tear down our institutions, erase our history, and work to destroy the family, they tell us to put our trust in them. They will save us, promising peace without the Prince of Peace. The Apostle Paul write:

When they say, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them, as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and there will be no escape!   (1 Thessalonians 5:23)

In today’s Old Testament lesson we read:

You shall fear the Lord your God; him alone you shall worship; to him you shall hold fast, and by his name you shall swear. He is your praise; he is your God, who has done for you these great and awesome things that your own eyes have seen.   (Deuteronomy 10:20-21)

Moses was reminding the people of the true architect of the nation of Israel. Perhaps we need the same reminder?

God is calling us to perfection, but we must be willing to follow him. He is our perfection. In today’s Gospel Jesus speaks about perfection:

Jesus said, “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”   (Matthew 5:43-48)

How will we ever achieve this perfection? We certainly cannot do it on our own. We need divine help. The hope for perfection is fulfilled by faith in Jesus Christ alone. It will take the Millennial Reign of Jesus on the Earth before that perfection fully comes.

Israel will one day be a holy nation. Since we are the ingrafted branches, the American dream and experiment will also be consummated as Christians believers the world over join the new Jerusalem. In the meantime, we must press on. God is for us and with us. He has extended his grace once more for the purpose of a last great harvest to usher in lost souls.

Let us follow the example of thr faithful ones who have gone before. Let us not despair. Others have made great sacrifices. Now is our time for sacrifice. Now is our time to come under the rule of God.

Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord,
The people He has chosen as His own inheritance.   (Psalm 33:12)

Only with God can we become a more perfect union.

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