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First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday

The Fullness of God

Today we celebrate the Holy Trinity of God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We celebrate the fullness of God,  To better understand his fullness, let us go back to the beginning, when God created the heavens and the earth,

In Genesis we read:

When God began to create[ the heavens and the earth, the earth was complete chaos, and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters. Then God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.   (Genesis 1:1-3)

Notice that the wind of God swept over his creation when he said “let there be light.

Then God said, “Let us make humans in our image, according to our likeness, and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over the cattle and over all the wild animals of the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”   (Genesis 1:26)

Observe how this time God said: “Let us.” To whom was he speaking? He was speaking to himself: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We are made in the image of God. If we are to understand our selves we must understand the fullness of his image. We are made to be like him.

Let us look at scripture pertaining to God from the standpoint of first the Son and then the Holy Spirit. What part did they did they play in the creation of humankind? Beginning with the beautiful prologue of the of John:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people.   (John 1:1-4)

Jesus, the Word made flesh, was the Father’s agent of creation. Our very lives came through him. Not only that, but we have reborn spiritually through him. His life has been given to those who believe:

For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.   (John 3:16)

The creation also relied on the Holy Spirit. He is the wind of God in Genesis. The Book of Proverbs goes into greater detail:

The Lord created me at the beginning of his work,
the first of his acts of long ago.

Ages ago I was set up,
at the first, before the beginning of the earth.

When there were no depths I was brought forth,
when there were no springs abounding with water.

Before the mountains had been shaped,
before the hills, I was brought forth–

when he had not yet made earth and fields,
or the world’s first bits of soil.

When he established the heavens, I was there,
when he drew a circle on the face of the deep,

when he made firm the skies above,
when he established the fountains of the deep,

when he assigned to the sea its limit,
so that the waters might not transgress his command,

when he marked out the foundations of the earth,
then I was beside him, like a master worker;

and I was daily his delight,
rejoicing before him always,

rejoicing in his inhabited world
and delighting in the human race.”   (Proverbs 8:22-31)

One of the things that struck me about this passage was the beautiful relationship between the Holy Spirit and God the Father. The Spirit, a master worker for the Father, was rejoicing in the work that the Father had given him. He rejoiced before the Father as he delighted in the human race that was being formed.

This leads us to the ministry of the Holy Spirit. In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus, as he was facing the cross, wanted his disciples to know about the person and ministry of Holy Spirit:

Jesus said to the disciples, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own, but will speak whatever he hears, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, because he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine. For this reason I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.” and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, because he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine. For this reason I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.”    (John 16:12-15)

The Apostle Paul wrote:

The Spirit helps us in our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but that very Spirit intercedes with groanings too deep for words. And God, who searches hearts, knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit[q] intercedes for the saints according to the will of God.   (Romans 8:26-27)

God gave his all to us when he created the heavens and the earth. The fullness of God brought forth human like. His Son gave up his position in heaven to ransom us from sin and death. God literally torn himself apart on a cruel cross, when Jesus bore our sins. In that moment, the Father had to separate himself from his beloved Son.
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How do we respond to God? He gave us his all to redeem us and restore his image in us. Do we give him all of ourselves in return? We need to see the complete image of God. We need the complete ministry of the Holy Trinity of God.

Jesus gave this great commission to his disciples before he ascended into heaven:

Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”   (Matthew 28:16-20)

Notice in this great commission the working of the Holy Trinity. The Church must teach all believers to obey all that Jesus has taught. Jesus, the voice of God, had taught us the true nature of God the Father and the essence of his commandments. But the power of the Holy Spirit is needed to help us to understand and obey all that Jesus has taught us.

Without and understanding of the Holy Trinity we are left without a very shallow faith indeed. While it is true that we cannot fully understand all the aspects of the Trinity, we can neither afford to ignore the Trinity. So many of our churches seem to stress one form of God over another. This is why we have so many different church doctrines. Doctrines cannot take the place of understanding the fullness of God.

Today, God is calling us. The Father wants us to know his love. The Son, Jesus, wants to fill us with the Holy Spirit and make all things new. The Holy Spirit wants to lead us into all truth, guide us, comfort us, interpret scriptures for us, and help us to pray. A loving God is always ministering to us. Let us acknowledge and embrace all that he is doing.

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Ascension Day

Clothed with Power from on High

There is much speculation in today’s Church concerning the date of Jesus’s return to the earth. Little has changed from the Early Church. This same concern was on the mind and hearts of the early disciples. From Acts we read:

So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”   (Acts 1:6-8)

Jesus did not answer his disciples directly. Rather, he told them that there was a more important consideration for his Church. They were to be witnesses to his resurrection. From Luke we read:

“Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. And see, I am sending upon you what my Father promised; so stay here in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”   (Luke 24:46-49)

There would be two essential ingredients to witnessing for Christ: 1) they were to proclaim the repentance and forgiveness of sins, and 2) that they would be clothed with power from on high. That does not sound like a seeker church with a watered down Gospel.

The Church is not need to blend into the world and, thus, have little relevance. We need to be clothed with the Holy Spirit in order to fulfill our calling. The age of the apostolic faith is not over. We are now the apostles.

Are we equipped for ministry? If not, let us ask for power from on high. Jesus promises to baptize us in the Holy Spirit. He has called us to do his greater works. Now is not the time to shrink back or hide behind man-made doctrines or traditions.

The questions the angels asked the disciples on the day of ascension is still applicable to us:

“Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up toward heaven? This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”   (Acts 1:11)

We do not have time to waste. Let us get on with the true task of the Church. Jesus may come at any moment. We should be living holy lives with our lamps full of oil all the time. Our concern must be for the lost. That is the heart of God. We were once lost and someone witnessed to us. Will we not witness to others? If we love Jesus then we will obey his command and commission..

His great commission is all the more important today as we approach the close of the Church age. Jesus speaks to us today:

You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”   (Acts 1:8)

Waiting on the return of Jesus is not our mission. The world is waiting on us. Jesus Christ living in us is the witness that the world needs to see. Have we received his Spirit? If not, we need to ask Jesus now. He will fill us and refill us with the Holy Spirit.

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First Sunday of Advent

A Righteous Branch Will Spring Up

Are we living in day where righteous living seems to be a thing of the past? An apparent lack of fairness and justice only seems to compound the problem. Many have said that things are so bad that only God can solve our problems.

The nation of Israel was experiencing such a time. The people had not heard a prophetic word from God for over four hundred years. Rome had overtaken the country and taxes were burdensome. Judaism had been corrupted by mandates imposed upon the people by certain elites who had reduced it to a system of and rules. The people were required to follow them but these elites did not. Does this sound familiar? For those who sought to true Judaism, only God could rescue them.

Fortunately, God had made promises through his prophets that he was about to keep. Reading from Jeremiah:

The days are surely coming, says the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah. In those days and at that time I will cause a righteous Branch to spring up for David; and he shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In those days Judah will be saved and Jerusalem will live in safety. And this is the name by which it will be called: “The Lord is our righteousness.”   (Jeremiah 33:14-16)

In the Season of Advent, we celebrate a solemn act of God that brought restoration, not only to Israel, but to the entire world. God acted where no one else could. He is still acting.

In today’s reading from the Gospel of Luke, Jesus seems to be talking about his second coming:

Jesus told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees; as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.   (Luke 21:29-33)

Is not Advent more about the first coming of Jesus? Yes, but the first and second coming are a part of the same Advent. Adven is a continuum.  God was and is moving into the world to establish his residence with us. It may seem imperceptible at times, but God is still moving. Jesus said: “Look at the fig tree.” Israel is the fig tree. We are the  fig tree. That righteous Branch is still sprouting. The kingdom of God is very near.

The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church at Thessalonica:

Now may our God and Father himself and our Lord Jesus direct our way to you. And may the Lord make you increase and abound in love for one another and for all, just as we abound in love for you. And may he so strengthen your hearts in holiness that you may be blameless before our God and Father at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his saints.   (1 Thessalonians 3:11-13)

We want God to move in our day. He is still moving; He is still coming into the world. He wants to come in to us. He wants to come in through us. The psalmist wrote:

Lead me in your truth and teach me,
for you are the God of my salvation;
in you have I trusted all the day long.

Remember, O Lord, your compassion and love,
for they are from everlasting.

Remember not the sins of my youth and my transgressions;
remember me according to your love
and for the sake of your goodness, O Lord.

Gracious and upright is the Lord;
therefore he teaches sinners in his way.

He guides the humble in doing right
and teaches his way to the lowly.   (Psalm 25:4-8)

Advent is a time of anticipation. It is a time of great expectation. Are we open to the coming of the Lord? Are we desiring for God to move upon us and through us? If so, his righteousness and justice will spread throughout our land. Revival will come. Let us open our hearts to Goed. Only then can he strengthen our hearts in holiness. Only then can we be blameless before our God and Father at the coming of our Lord Jesus.

Some may be caught by surprise at the close od the age. They did not see the fig tree. They did not see the righteous Branch. They did not see God’s power alive in us. Reading from the Book of Revelation:

To Him who loved us and washed us from our sins in His own blood, and has made us kings and priests to His God and Father, to Him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.

Behold, He is coming with clouds, and every eye will see Him, even they who pierced Him.   (Revelation 1:5-7)

But we see by faith, today, and each new day. His righteous Branch still grows. It is growing in us.

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